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MLB The Show 22 announced, coming to PS4, PS5, Xbox One, Xbox Series X, Switch (Day One on Game Pass)

Phantom Thief

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$70 on Xbox and PlayStation, full cross play and cross save across Xbox, PlayStation, and Nintendo platforms. MLB publishing on Xbox and Switch.
 
Probably something I'd pick up for the Switch. Japan probably would buy the Switch version.
 
Switch Sales will be big but honestly its a good move and surely puts pressure on other half-arsed ports if The Show is fully fledged.
It is full fledged, the Switch version has full cross play and cross save with the other versions, implying total parity
 
Pretty sure MLB The Show is digital-only outside of the Americas.
This is actually not correct, at least as of MLB The Show 21, as you can order a physical copy off of Amazon Japan:
51S7xpZRw2S._AC_.jpg


Can't say I've ever seen it on a store shelf, I admit, but this is probably more because the game itself, despite the package, is still entirely in English (text, commentators, etc.)

Korea also had a unique physical version (with a different cover athlete) a number of times, though I can't speak to how many of those there have been. Seems like the kind of thing that might actually be worth localising if they could get the NPB license to go with it, especially now that the only other remaining (realistic) baseball game, Pro Baseball Spirits, appears to have moved over to being Switch-exclusive.
 
Since the advent of the first PlayStation and especially starting with Xbox's debut on the market, Nintendo platforms have become the least favourite ecosystem to play simulative sport games on in Western markets. The Tiger Woods series on Wii to this day is still the strongest example of a simulative sport game that witnessed sgreat results on a Nintendo platform even when compared to other systems, with a major contribution coming from the implementation of the Wiimote / Wiimote Plus. However, outside of this, the general trend has been that sport games sell quite a lot less on Nintendo platforms than Sony's (and Microsoft's in markets where they're more relevant like the UK and North America), even on commercially successful consoles. They may have good sales but still on quite a lower level than others.

Initiatives such as EA Sports' "All Play" didn't exactly help either: not a good way to tackle the image and ecosystem issue plaguing Nintendo platforms in this specific aspect, and of course the past generation made things even worse, with even FIFA games actually skipping Nintendo platforms after FIFA 15's last release on both Wii and 3DS. This has translated in lack of a cultivation of a proper audience for simulative sport games on Nintendo platforms, even on Switch in some way, despite this being the Nintendo system with the strongest """traditional""" audience in a long time. Again, EA Sports hasn't exactly done as much as they could've with the shift from regular entries to Legacy Editions starting with FIFA 19; but thanks to aggressive pricing strategies they're still reaping rewards and witnessing increasing sales. But even titles such as NBA 2K, yearly iterations that are legit attempts by Take 2 to bring back the PS4 / XBO experience to Switch (complete with casinos), still witness far lower sales on Switch than elsewhere especially at launch. In my opinion, that happens also because, again, the audience for sport games is small, thus there's less demand and the cycle repeats itself more or less.

The lack of an established audience is both a consequence of years of unsuccessful platforms / mismanagement / uncertainty and a problem on its own, a rather major one. In the closed ecosystem scenario, customers will far prefer to play with their friends, thus either on PlayStation or Xbox systems rather than Nintendo's. Especially in the current era where platform holders try to keep their customers engaged in their own ecosystems as long as possible, as well as the rising phenomenon of micro-transactions and Ultimate Team-like modes.

But what about a scenario where all systems, including Switch, support cross-play, cross-save and cross-progression? Such a massive barrier is gone: IMHO potential customers will be much more willing to purchase their game on a Nintendo console knowing that

a) that console is owned by lots of people
b) they'll be able to play with their friends regardless of whether they own a Nintendo console or not
c) they'll be able to carry over saves and progress on any platform they play the game on

This is the solution to an historical issue for Nintendo platforms, especially once such as Switch with an immediately attractive pitch for new customers: play the game wherever and whenever you want, with whoever you want.

This is why I'm very, very interested to see whether and, in the case, how much cross-play / cross-save / cross-progression will help the Switch version's sales. It may unironically be an important moment for the next few years of simulative sport games on Nintendo platforms, and for sport games in general.
 
I think that's pretty great even if I know next to nothing about this series. Going to Xbox and Game Pass last year helped it grow tremendously and adding another popular platform can only help extend the audience. Plus it's a win for Nintendo as they get another yearly AAA Sports IP in their portfolio, one that seems to be fully featured like NBA 2K and unlike Fifa.
 
Since the advent of the first PlayStation and especially starting with Xbox's debut on the market, Nintendo platforms have become the least favourite ecosystem to play simulative sport games on in Western markets. The Tiger Woods series on Wii to this day is still the strongest example of a simulative sport game that witnessed sgreat results on a Nintendo platform even when compared to other systems, with a major contribution coming from the implementation of the Wiimote / Wiimote Plus. However, outside of this, the general trend has been that sport games sell quite a lot less on Nintendo platforms than Sony's (and Microsoft's in markets where they're more relevant like the UK and North America), even on commercially successful consoles. They may have good sales but still on quite a lower level than others.

Initiatives such as EA Sports' "All Play" didn't exactly help either: not a good way to tackle the image and ecosystem issue plaguing Nintendo platforms in this specific aspect, and of course the past generation made things even worse, with even FIFA games actually skipping Nintendo platforms after FIFA 15's last release on both Wii and 3DS. This has translated in lack of a cultivation of a proper audience for simulative sport games on Nintendo platforms, even on Switch in some way, despite this being the Nintendo system with the strongest """traditional""" audience in a long time. Again, EA Sports hasn't exactly done as much as they could've with the shift from regular entries to Legacy Editions starting with FIFA 19; but thanks to aggressive pricing strategies they're still reaping rewards and witnessing increasing sales. But even titles such as NBA 2K, yearly iterations that are legit attempts by Take 2 to bring back the PS4 / XBO experience to Switch (complete with casinos), still witness far lower sales on Switch than elsewhere especially at launch. In my opinion, that happens also because, again, the audience for sport games is small, thus there's less demand and the cycle repeats itself more or less.

The lack of an established audience is both a consequence of years of unsuccessful platforms / mismanagement / uncertainty and a problem on its own, a rather major one. In the closed ecosystem scenario, customers will far prefer to play with their friends, thus either on PlayStation or Xbox systems rather than Nintendo's. Especially in the current era where platform holders try to keep their customers engaged in their own ecosystems as long as possible, as well as the rising phenomenon of micro-transactions and Ultimate Team-like modes.

But what about a scenario where all systems, including Switch, support cross-play, cross-save and cross-progression? Such a massive barrier is gone: IMHO potential customers will be much more willing to purchase their game on a Nintendo console knowing that

a) that console is owned by lots of people
b) they'll be able to play with their friends regardless of whether they own a Nintendo console or not
c) they'll be able to carry over saves and progress on any platform they play the game on

This is the solution to an historical issue for Nintendo platforms, especially once such as Switch with an immediately attractive pitch for new customers: play the game wherever and whenever you want, with whoever you want.

This is why I'm very, very interested to see whether and, in the case, how much cross-play / cross-save / cross-progression will help the Switch version's sales. It may unironically be an important moment for the next few years of simulative sport games on Nintendo platforms, and for sport games in general.
Very informative post. I agree that sports games have really neglected Nintendo for a long time. It's crazy that even with the success of the Switch it still gets old FIFA games and is still missing stuff like Madden on the platform. The fact that FIFA still does so well on Switch despite that really shows that there is an audience for these games on Switch if you will just sell your game to them.
 
Unfortunately they probably won’t bother translating it.
I know this is hilariously out there - maybe Nintendo helps translate and publish in Japan for regional exclusivity?

Okay I know it won't happen but I would pay to watch that lol
 
Can't say I've ever seen it on a store shelf, I admit, but this is probably more because the game itself, despite the package, is still entirely in English (text, commentators, etc.)

Korea also had a unique physical version (with a different cover athlete) a number of times, though I can't speak to how many of those there have been. Seems like the kind of thing that might actually be worth localising if they could get the NPB license to go with it, especially now that the only other remaining (realistic) baseball game, Pro Baseball Spirits, appears to have moved over to being Switch-exclusive.
Man, Sony never cared to localize the game in more than 15 years of history? Not even to their mother tongue? Or is this a case of only the last title? Even other western games like Spiderman had Japanese localization.
 
This announcement shocked me 😯 I thought MLB coming to switch was a fluke after it passed the platform last year. Could it be it didn’t come last year was because of lack of experience back then?
 
Y'know, with acquisition talk in the air, and with the knowledge that sports games are major wealth generators, I wouldn't be surprised to see, in the next 10 years, the players' associations or the leagues of each professional sport band together and buy out 2K and EA's sports division to reap all the benefits of their own brands with the pre-existing talent pools.
This deal that MLB struck with SIE and San Diego Studio to get this game on every platform (and making the larger share of money off the non-PS releases, I'm sure) feels like a precursor to that.
 
Man, Sony never cared to localize the game in more than 15 years of history? Not even to their mother tongue? Or is this a case of only the last title? Even other western games like Spiderman had Japanese localization.
Well, I don't think the game got a release at all in Japan until fairly recently, and it's never been released in anything except English as far as I know. I can only guess it had something to do with the league itself; MLB is American, and Japan has their own very serious baseball league, the NPB. Konami already makes a game based on this league (Pro Baseball Spirits), so there wasn't really a ton of demand for an MLB-specific game, I suspect.

It's not like FIFA, which of course is much more international, and includes Japanese pro football clubs.
 
Since the advent of the first PlayStation and especially starting with Xbox's debut on the market, Nintendo platforms have become the least favourite ecosystem to play simulative sport games on in Western markets. The Tiger Woods series on Wii to this day is still the strongest example of a simulative sport game that witnessed sgreat results on a Nintendo platform even when compared to other systems, with a major contribution coming from the implementation of the Wiimote / Wiimote Plus. However, outside of this, the general trend has been that sport games sell quite a lot less on Nintendo platforms than Sony's (and Microsoft's in markets where they're more relevant like the UK and North America), even on commercially successful consoles. They may have good sales but still on quite a lower level than others.

Initiatives such as EA Sports' "All Play" didn't exactly help either: not a good way to tackle the image and ecosystem issue plaguing Nintendo platforms in this specific aspect, and of course the past generation made things even worse, with even FIFA games actually skipping Nintendo platforms after FIFA 15's last release on both Wii and 3DS. This has translated in lack of a cultivation of a proper audience for simulative sport games on Nintendo platforms, even on Switch in some way, despite this being the Nintendo system with the strongest """traditional""" audience in a long time. Again, EA Sports hasn't exactly done as much as they could've with the shift from regular entries to Legacy Editions starting with FIFA 19; but thanks to aggressive pricing strategies they're still reaping rewards and witnessing increasing sales. But even titles such as NBA 2K, yearly iterations that are legit attempts by Take 2 to bring back the PS4 / XBO experience to Switch (complete with casinos), still witness far lower sales on Switch than elsewhere especially at launch. In my opinion, that happens also because, again, the audience for sport games is small, thus there's less demand and the cycle repeats itself more or less.

The lack of an established audience is both a consequence of years of unsuccessful platforms / mismanagement / uncertainty and a problem on its own, a rather major one. In the closed ecosystem scenario, customers will far prefer to play with their friends, thus either on PlayStation or Xbox systems rather than Nintendo's. Especially in the current era where platform holders try to keep their customers engaged in their own ecosystems as long as possible, as well as the rising phenomenon of micro-transactions and Ultimate Team-like modes.

But what about a scenario where all systems, including Switch, support cross-play, cross-save and cross-progression? Such a massive barrier is gone: IMHO potential customers will be much more willing to purchase their game on a Nintendo console knowing that

a) that console is owned by lots of people
b) they'll be able to play with their friends regardless of whether they own a Nintendo console or not
c) they'll be able to carry over saves and progress on any platform they play the game on

This is the solution to an historical issue for Nintendo platforms, especially once such as Switch with an immediately attractive pitch for new customers: play the game wherever and whenever you want, with whoever you want.

This is why I'm very, very interested to see whether and, in the case, how much cross-play / cross-save / cross-progression will help the Switch version's sales. It may unironically be an important moment for the next few years of simulative sport games on Nintendo platforms, and for sport games in general.
While I agree it's been mismanaged, I don't think that precludes it from growing eventually and establishing a bigger audience eventually. I'd actually be interested to see if we're at least seeing sales of sports titles grow on Switch.
 
Since the advent of the first PlayStation and especially starting with Xbox's debut on the market, Nintendo platforms have become the least favourite ecosystem to play simulative sport games on in Western markets. The Tiger Woods series on Wii to this day is still the strongest example of a simulative sport game that witnessed sgreat results on a Nintendo platform even when compared to other systems, with a major contribution coming from the implementation of the Wiimote / Wiimote Plus. However, outside of this, the general trend has been that sport games sell quite a lot less on Nintendo platforms than Sony's (and Microsoft's in markets where they're more relevant like the UK and North America), even on commercially successful consoles. They may have good sales but still on quite a lower level than others.

Initiatives such as EA Sports' "All Play" didn't exactly help either: not a good way to tackle the image and ecosystem issue plaguing Nintendo platforms in this specific aspect, and of course the past generation made things even worse, with even FIFA games actually skipping Nintendo platforms after FIFA 15's last release on both Wii and 3DS. This has translated in lack of a cultivation of a proper audience for simulative sport games on Nintendo platforms, even on Switch in some way, despite this being the Nintendo system with the strongest """traditional""" audience in a long time. Again, EA Sports hasn't exactly done as much as they could've with the shift from regular entries to Legacy Editions starting with FIFA 19; but thanks to aggressive pricing strategies they're still reaping rewards and witnessing increasing sales. But even titles such as NBA 2K, yearly iterations that are legit attempts by Take 2 to bring back the PS4 / XBO experience to Switch (complete with casinos), still witness far lower sales on Switch than elsewhere especially at launch. In my opinion, that happens also because, again, the audience for sport games is small, thus there's less demand and the cycle repeats itself more or less.

The lack of an established audience is both a consequence of years of unsuccessful platforms / mismanagement / uncertainty and a problem on its own, a rather major one. In the closed ecosystem scenario, customers will far prefer to play with their friends, thus either on PlayStation or Xbox systems rather than Nintendo's. Especially in the current era where platform holders try to keep their customers engaged in their own ecosystems as long as possible, as well as the rising phenomenon of micro-transactions and Ultimate Team-like modes.

But what about a scenario where all systems, including Switch, support cross-play, cross-save and cross-progression? Such a massive barrier is gone: IMHO potential customers will be much more willing to purchase their game on a Nintendo console knowing that

a) that console is owned by lots of people
b) they'll be able to play with their friends regardless of whether they own a Nintendo console or not
c) they'll be able to carry over saves and progress on any platform they play the game on

This is the solution to an historical issue for Nintendo platforms, especially once such as Switch with an immediately attractive pitch for new customers: play the game wherever and whenever you want, with whoever you want.

This is why I'm very, very interested to see whether and, in the case, how much cross-play / cross-save / cross-progression will help the Switch version's sales. It may unironically be an important moment for the next few years of simulative sport games on Nintendo platforms, and for sport games in general.

There used to be a time where Nintendo of America was very aggressive in competing in the sports market. They had published games like Ken Griffey Jr. Presents Major League Baseball and Kobe Bryant in NBA Courtside.
 
The collector's edition has been revealed.

Bad news is, the MVP Editions aren't on Switch. The good news is that the digital deluxe edition is, which is mostly the same it seems, just without the fancy box.




Edit: Here's the site with the content comparison:


The digital deluxe edition is the ultimate edition. All Switch loses out on is the fancy case, likely a cost-cut move as they'd need a unique cart-based case, vs just using one for every other version (most steel cased release just stick a clear sleeve over it to include the platform stuff). Shame, but hey at least it's still an identical version otherwise. If you're digital anyway, this is nothing.
 
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